Subjects

Back

Music

Intent 

At Sayes Court School, we believe that high-quality Music lessons will inspire children to show an appreciation of all genres of music as well as developing their own skills through composition and performance. 

Our Music is fully-inclusive, enabling a universal language to be spoken by all our pupils. We provide a music education that empowers individuals to partake in one of the highest art forms, that promotes self-confidence, self-esteem and gives all pupils a sense of achievement. 

We do this through providing opportunities for appreciation, composition and singing alongside new opportunities and chances to showcase talents within and beyond our school community. We are committed to inspiring children to develop a life-long love of music, develop creativity, imagination and fostering talents. 

Implementation 

Teachers are supported to plan an inspiring curriculum which allows our children to be confident in developing their skills into becoming enthusiastic musicians. As part of the planning process teachers will plan for 

  • Knowledge and vocabulary that the children will need to master. 

  • A cycle of lessons for each subject, which carefully plans for progression and depth through Charanga. 

  • Challenge questions for pupils to apply their learning in a philosophical/open manner; 

  • Trips and visiting experts who will enhance the learning experience; 

  • Focus Music teaching with resident musicians in Key Stage 2 with the opportunities to perform within the school and the wider community. 

What this looks like in practice: 

  • All year groups in the school, including EYFS, have a music session. 

  • The length of the lesson is of 30-minutes from Nursery to Year 6. 

  • Vocabulary from previous sessions is revised and built upon to ensure that pupils are developing a bank of vocabulary. 

  • There are regular opportunities for pupils to practise their singing abilities, music theory, rhythm and composers. 

  • In KS2, there are opportunities for pupils to learn about the History of Music. 

  • We use talk for learning in our lessons to guarantee that all students practice their speaking, reading and listening skills. 

  • SEND students are provided with differentiated instruments to ensure the core of the music session can still be obtained. E.g. shakers, coconuts, maracas instead of glockenspiel or recorders. 

Schemes, programmes and resources used to support Music: 

  • Charanga by Surrey Arts 

Impact 

Our Music Curriculum is high quality, well thought out and is planned to demonstrate progression. If children are keeping up with the curriculum, they are deemed to be making good or better progress. In addition, we measure the impact of our curriculum through the following methods: 

  • A reflection on standards achieved against the planned outcomes; 

  • A celebration of learning for each term which demonstrates progression across the school; 

  • Pupil discussions about their learning; which includes discussion of their thoughts, ideas, processing and evaluations of work. 

SMSC in Music 

Music is key to enabling children to become a global musician. By learning about rhythm and exploring their musical language, children become more culturally aware. Social interaction is promoted in these sessions due to the key aspect of partner talk and performing. 

Human Capital 

We celebrate Music in the school not only through our lessons, but it is also embedded in other subjects. From assemblies to times tables songs, we can have a great variety of music throughout the year. 

We are also very lucky to have our own Orchestra Club on Mondays, where students apply their music skills taught during the week and play the recorder. We do also perform concerts on important events for the school.

 

Reception 

*Nursery will implement Music throughout their day. Formal lessons begin in Reception. 

Year 1 

Year 2 

Year 3  

Year 4  

Year 5  

Year 6  

Musicianship 

  • Use large-muscle movements to wave flags and streamers, 

paint and make marks. 

  • Respond to what they have heard, expressing their thoughts and feelings. 

Use body percussion, instruments and voices. 

 

In the key centres of: C major, F major, G major and A minor. 

 

Find and keep a steady beat together. 

 

Understand the difference between creating a rhythm pattern and a pitch pattern. 

 

Copy back simple rhythmic patterns using long and short. 

 

Copy back simple melodic patterns using high and low. 

 

Complete vocal warm-ups with a copy back option to use Solfa. 

Use body percussion, instruments and voices. 

 

In the key centres of: C major, G major and A minor. 

 

Find and keep a steady beat. 

 

Copy back simple rhythmic patterns using long and short. 

 

Copy back simple melodic patterns using high and low. 

 

Complete vocal warm-ups with a copy back option to use Solfa. 

 

Sing short phrases independently. 

..................Column Break.................. 

Use body percussion, instruments and voices. 

 

In the key centres of: C major, F major, G major and A minor. 

 

In the time signatures of: 2/4, 3/4 and 4/4. 

 

Find and keep a steady beat. 

 

Copy back and improvise simple rhythmic patterns using minims, crotchets, quavers and their rests. 

 

Copy back and improvise simple melodic patterns using the notes: C,D,E 

 

G,A,B 

 

F,G,A 

 

A,B,C 

 

Use body percussion, instruments and voices. 

 

In the key centres of: C major, F major, G major and A minor. 

 

In the time signatures of: 2/4, 3/4 and 4/4. 

 

Find and keep a steady beat. 

 

Listen and copy rhythmic patterns made of semibreves, minims, dotted crotchets, crotchets, quavers, semiquavers and their rests, by ear or from notation. 

 

Copy back melodic patterns using the 

 

notes: 

 

C,D,E 

 

C,D,E,G,A 

 

G,A,B 

 

G,A,B,D,E 

 

F,G,A 

 

A,B,C,D,E,F,G 

 

Use body percussion, instruments and voices. 

 

In the key centres of: C major, G major, D major, F major and A minor. 

 

In the time signatures of: 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 5/4 and 6/8. 

 

Find and keep a steady beat. 

 

Listen and copy rhythmic patterns made of dotted minims, minims, dotted crotchets, crotchets, dotted quavers, triplet quavers, quavers, semiquavers and their rests, by ear or from notation. 

 

Copy back melodic patterns using the 

 

notes: 

 

C,D,E 

 

C,D,E,F,G,A,B 

 

D, E, F♯, G, A 

 

A, B, C, D, E, F♯, G 

 

F, G, A, B♭, C, D, E 

 

G, A, B, C, D, E, F♯ 

 

Use body percussion, instruments and voices. 

 

In the key centres of: C major, G major, D major, A minor and D minor. 

 

In the time signatures of: 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 5/4 and 6/8. 

 

Find and keep a steady beat. 

 

Listen and copy rhythmic patterns made of minims, dotted crotchets, crotchets, dotted quavers, triplet quavers, quavers, semiquavers and their rests, by ear or from notation. 

 

Copy back melodic patterns using the notes: 

 

D,E,F,G,A 

 

C,D,E,F,G,A,B 

 

G, A, B, C, D, E, F♯ 

 

D, E, F♯, G, A, B, C♯ 

 

A,B,C,D,E,F,G 

 

Listening 

  • Listen with increased attention to sounds. 

 

Move and dance with the music. 

 

Find the steady beat. 

 

Talk about feelings created by the music. 

 

Recognise some band and orchestral instruments. 

 

Describe tempo as fast or slow. 

 

Describe dynamics as loud and quiet. 

 

Join in sections of the song, eg chorus. 

 

Begin to understand where the music fits in the world. 

 

Begin to understand about different styles of music. 

 

Mark the beat of a listening piece (eg Boléro by Ravel) by tapping or clapping and recognising tempo, as well as changes in tempo. 

 

Walk in time to the beat of a piece of music. 

 

Identify the beat groupings in the music you sing and listen, eg 2-time, 3-time etc. 

 

Move and dance with the music confidently. 

 

Talk about how the music makes you feel. 

 

Find different steady beats. 

 

Describe tempo as fast or slow. 

 

Describe dynamics as loud or quiet. 

 

Join in sections of the song, eg call and response. 

 

Start to talk about the style of a piece of music. 

 

Recognise some band and orchestral instruments. 

 

Start to talk about where music might fit into the world. 

 

Share your thoughts and feelings about the music together. 

 

Find the beat or groove of the music. 

 

Walk, move or clap a steady beat with others, changing the speed of the beat as the tempo of the music changes. 

 

Invent different actions to move in time with the music. 

 

Talk about what the song or piece of music means. 

 

Identify some instruments you can hear playing. 

 

Identify if it’s a male or female voice singing the song. 

 

Talk about the style of the music. 

 

Talk about the words of a song. 

 

Think about why the song or piece of music was written. 

 

Find and demonstrate the steady beat. 

 

Identify 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4 metre. 

 

Identify the tempo as fast, slow or steady. 

 

Recognise the style of music you are listening to. 

 

Discuss the structures of songs. 

 

Identify: 

 

  • Call and response 

 

  • A solo vocal or instrumental line and the rest of the ensemble 

  • A change in texture 

 

  • Articulation on certain words 

 

  • Programme music 

 

Explain what a main theme is and identify when it is repeated. 

 

Know and understand what a musical introduction is and its purpose. 

 

Recall by ear memorable phrases heard in the music. 

 

Identify major and minor tonality. 

 

Recognise the sound and notes of the pentatonic scale by ear and from notation. 

 

Describe legato and staccato. 

 

Recognise the following styles and any important musical features that distinguish the style: 20th and 21st Century Orchestral, Reggae, Soul, R&B, Pop, Folk, Jazz, Disco, Musicals, Classical, Rock, Gospel, Romantic, Choral, Funk and Electronic Dance Music. 

 

Talk about feelings created by the music. 

 

Justify a personal opinion with reference to Musical Elements. 

 

Find and demonstrate the steady beat. 

 

Identify 2/4, 3/4, 6/8 and 5/4 metre. 

 

Identify the musical style of a song or piece of music. 

 

Identify instruments by ear and through a range of media. 

 

Discuss the structure of the music with reference to verse, chorus, bridge, repeat signs, chorus and final chorus, improvisation, call and response, and AB form. 

 

Explain a bridge passage and its position in a song. 

 

Recall by ear memorable phrases heard in the music. 

 

Identify major and minor tonality. 

 

Recognise the sound and notes of the pentatonic and Blues scales, by ear and from notation. 

 

Explain the role of a main theme in musical structure. 

 

Know and understand what a musical introduction is and its purpose. 

 

Explain rapping. 

 

Recognise the following styles and any key musical features that distinguish the style: 20th and 21st Century Orchestral, Gospel, Pop, Minimalism, Rock n' Roll, South African, Contemporary Jazz, Reggae, Film Music, Hip Hop, Funk, Romantic and Musicals. 

 

Talk about feelings created by the music. 

 

Justify a personal opinion with reference to Musical Elements. 

 

Identify 2/4, 4/4, 3/4, 6/8 and 5/4. 

 

Identify the musical style of a song using some musical vocabulary to discuss its Musical Elements. 

 

Identify the following instruments by ear and through a range of media: bass guitar, electric guitar, percussion, sections of the orchestra such as brass, woodwind and strings, electric organ, congas, pianos and synthesizers, and vocal techniques such as scat singing. 

 

Discuss the structure of the music with reference to verse, chorus, bridge and an instrumental break. 

 

Explain a bridge passage and its position in a song. 

 

Recall by ear memorable phrases heard in the music. 

 

Identify major and minor tonality, chord triads I, IV and V, and intervals within a major scale. 

 

Explain the role of a main theme in musical structure. 

 

Know and understand what a musical introduction and outro is, and its purpose. 

 

Identify the sound of a Gospel choir and soloist, Rock band, symphony orchestra and A Cappella groups. 

 

Recognise the following styles and any key musical features that distinguish the style: 20th and 21st Century Orchestral, Soul, Pop, Hip Hop, Jazz: Swing, Rock, Disco, Romantic, Zimbabwean Pop, R&B, Folk, Gospel, Salsa, Reggae, Musicals and Film Music. 

Singing 

  • Sing a large repertoire of songs. 

  • Remember and sing entire songs. 

  • Sing the pitch of a tone sung by another person (‘pitch match’). 

  • Sing the melodic shape (moving melody, such as up and down, down and up) of familiar songs. 

  • Sing a range of well-known nursery rhymes and songs. 

 

Sing, rap, rhyme, chant and use spoken word. 

 

Demonstrate good singing posture. 

 

Sing songs from memory. 

 

Copy back intervals of an octave and fifth (high, low). 

 

Sing in unison. 

 

Sing as part of a choir. 

 

Demonstrate good singing posture. 

 

Sing songs from memory and/or from notation. 

 

Sing to communicate the meaning of the words. 

 

Sing in unison and sometimes in parts, and with more pitching accuracy. 

 

Understand and follow the leader or conductor. 

 

Add actions to a song. 

 

Move confidently to a steady beat. 

 

Talk about feelings created by the music/song. 

 

Recognise some band and orchestral instruments. 

 

Describe tempo as fast or slow. 

 

Join in sections of the song, eg chorus. 

 

Begin to understand where the music fits in the world. 

 

Begin to talk about and understand the style of the music. 

 

Know the meaning of dynamics (loud/quiet) and tempo (fast/slow), and be able to demonstrate these when singing by responding to (a) the leader's directions and 

 

  1. visual symbols (eg crescendo, decrescendo, pause). 

Sing as part of a choir. 

 

Sing a widening range of unison songs, of varying styles and structures. 

 

Demonstrate good singing posture. 

 

Perform actions confidently and in time to a range of action songs. 

 

Sing songs from memory and/or from notation. 

 

Sing with awareness of following the beat. 

 

Sing with attention to clear diction. 

 

Sing expressively, with attention to the meaning of the words. 

 

Sing in unison. 

 

Understand and follow the leader or conductor. 

 

Copy back simple melodic phrases using the voice. 

 

Rehearse and learn songs from memory and/or with notation. 

 

Sing in different time signatures: 2/4, 3/4 and 4/4. 

 

Sing as part of a choir with awareness of size: the larger, the thicker and richer the musical texture. 

 

Demonstrate good singing posture. 

 

Demonstrate vowel sounds, blended sounds and consonants. 

 

Sing ‘on pitch' and 'in time'. 

 

Sing expressively, with attention to breathing and phrasing. 

 

Sing expressively, with attention to staccato and legato. 

 

Talk about the different styles of singing used for different styles of song. 

 

Talk about how the songs and their styles connect to the world. 

 

Rehearse and learn songs from memory and/or with notation. 

 

Sing in 2/4, 3/4, 4/4 and 6/8 time. 

 

Sing in unison and parts, and as part of a smaller group. 

 

Sing ‘on pitch' and 'in time'. 

 

Sing a second part in a song. 

 

Self-correct if lost or out of time. 

 

Sing expressively, with attention to breathing and phrasing. 

 

Sing expressively, with attention to dynamics and articulation. 

 

Develop confidence as a soloist. 

 

Talk about the different styles of singing used for different styles of song. 

 

Talk confidently about how connected you feel to the music and how it connects in the world. 

 

Respond to a leader or conductor. 

 

Rehearse and learn songs from memory and/or with notation. 

 

Sing a broad range of songs as part of a choir, including those that involve syncopated rhythms, with a good sense of ensemble and performance. This should include observing rhythm, phrasing, accurate pitching and appropriate style. 

 

Continue to sing in parts where appropriate. 

 

Sing in 2/4, 4/4, 3/4, 5/4 and 6/8. 

 

Sing with and without an accompaniment. 

 

Sing syncopated melodic patterns. 

 

Demonstrate and maintain good posture and breath control whilst singing. 

 

Sing expressively, with attention to breathing and phrasing. 

 

Sing expressively, with attention to dynamics and articulation. 

 

Lead a singing rehearsal. 

 

Talk about the different styles of singing used for the different styles of songs sung in this year. 

 

Discuss with others how connected you are to the music and songs, and how the songs and styles are connected to the world. 

 

Notation 

 

Explore ways of representing high and low sounds, and long and short sounds, using symbols and any appropriate means of notation. 

 

If appropriate: explore standard notation, using crotchets, quavers and minims, and simple combinations of: C,D,E,F,G 

 

F,G,A 

 

G,B,D 

 

D, E, F♯, G, A 

 

D,A,C 

 

Explore ways of representing high and low sounds, and long and short sounds, using symbols and any appropriate means of notation. 

 

Explore standard notation, using crotchets, quavers, minims and semibreves, and simple combinations of: C,D,E,F,G,A,B 

G, A, B, C, D, E, F♯ 

 

F, G, A, B♭, C, D, E 

 

A,B,C,D,E 

 

Identify hand signals as notation, and recognise music notation on a stave of five lines. 

 

Explore ways of representing high and low sounds, and long and short sounds, using symbols and any appropriate means of notation. 

 

Explore standard notation, using minims, 

 

semibreves, dotted crotchets, crotchets, 

 

quavers and semiquavers, and simple 

 

combinations of: 

 

C,D,E,F,G,A,B 

 

F, G, A, B♭, C 

 

G,A,B,C,D,E 

 

E, F♯, G♯, A, B 

 

Read and respond to semibreves, minims, crotchets and paired quavers. 

 

Identify: 

 

  • Stave 

 

  • Treble clef 

 

  • Time signature 

 

  • Lines and spaces on the stave 

 

Identify and understand the differences between crotchets and paired quavers. 

 

Apply spoken word to rhythms, understanding how to link each syllable to one musical note. 

 

Explore ways of representing high and low sounds, and long and short sounds, using symbols and any appropriate means of notation. 

 

Explore standard notation, using semibreves, minims, dotted crotchets, crotchets, quavers and semiquavers, and simple combinations of: C,D,E,F,G,A,B 

 

F, G, A, B♭, C 

 

G, A, B, C, D, E, F♯ 

 

D, E, F♯, G, A, B, C 

 

Read and respond to semibreves, minims, dotted crotchets, crotchets, quavers and semiquavers. 

 

Identify: 

 

  • Stave 

 

  • Treble clef 

 

  • Time signature 

 

Identify and understand the differences between minims, crotchets, paired quavers and rests. 

 

Read and perform pitch notation within a range. 

 

Follow and perform simple rhythmic scores to a steady beat: maintain individual parts accurately within the rhythmic texture, achieving a sense of ensemble. 

 

Explore ways of representing high and low sounds, and long and short sounds, using symbols and any appropriate means of notation. 

 

Explore standard notation, using minims, dotted crotchets, crotchets, quavers and semiquavers, and simple combinations of: C,D,E,F,G,A,B 

 

F, G, A, B♭, C, D, E 

 

G, A, B, C, D, E, F♯ 

 

C, G, A♭, B♭ 

 

G, G♯, A, B♭, C 

 

D,E,F,G,A,B,C 

 

E♭, F, G, A♭, B♭, C, D♭ 

 

Identify: 

 

  • Stave 

 

  • Treble clef 

 

  • Time signature 

 

Read and respond to minims, crotchets, quavers, dotted quavers and semiquavers. 

 

Recognise how notes are grouped when notated. 

 

Identify the stave and symbols on the stave (such as the treble clef), the name of the notes on lines and in spaces, barlines, a flat sign and a sharp sign. 

 

Further understand the differences between semibreves, minims, crotchets and crotchet rests, paired quavers and semiquavers. 

 

Understand the differences between 2/4, 3/4 and 4/4 time signatures. 

 

Read and perform pitch notation within an octave (eg C–C′/do–do). 

Explore ways of representing high and low sounds, and long and short sounds, using symbols and any appropriate means of notation. 

 

Explore standard notation, using dotted semibreves, dotted minims, minims, triplet crotchets, dotted crotchets, crotchets, dotted quavers, quavers and semiquavers, and simple combinations of: C,D,E,F,G,A,B 

 

F, G, A, B♭, C, D, E 

 

F, G, A♭, B♭, C, D, E♭ 

 

G, A, B♭, C, D, E, F 

 

G, A, B, C, D, E, F♯ 

 

D,E,F,G,A 

 

D, E, F♯, A, B, C♯ 

 

E, F♯, G, G♯, A, B, C, C♯ 

 

E♭, F, G, A♭, B♭, C, D 

 

Identify: 

 

  • Stave 

 

  • Treble clef 

 

  • Time signature 

 

Read and respond to minims, crotchets, quavers, dotted quavers and semiquavers. 

 

Recognise how notes are grouped when notated. 

 

Identify the stave and symbols on the stave (such as the treble clef), the name of the notes on lines and in spaces, barlines, a flat sign and a sharp sign. 

 

 

Playing Instruments 

Play instruments with increasing control to express their feelings and ideas. 

 

Rehearse and learn to play a simple melodic instrumental part by ear or from simple notation, in C major, F major, D major and D minor. 

 

Rehearse and learn to play a simple melodic instrumental part by ear or from notation, in C major, F major and G major. 

 

Rehearse and learn to play a simple melodic instrumental part by ear or from notation, in C major, F major, G major and E major. 

 

Develop facility in playing tuned percussion or a melodic instrument, such as a violin or recorder. 

Rehearse and learn to play a simple melodic instrumental part by ear or from notation, in C major, F major, G major and D major. 

 

Rehearse and learn to play a simple melodic instrumental part by ear or from notation, in C major, F major, G major, E♭ major, C minor and D minor. 

 

Play melodies on tuned percussion, melodic instruments or keyboards, following staff notation written on one stave and using notes within the middle C–C′/do–do range. This should initially be done as a whole class, with greater independence gained each lesson through smaller group performance. 

Rehearse and learn to play one of four differentiated instrumental parts by ear or from notation, in the tonal centres of C major, F major, G major, D major, E major, A major, E♭ major, D minor and F minor. 

 

Play a melody following staff notation written on one stave and using notes within an octave range (do–do); make decisions about dynamic range, including very loud (fortissimo), very quiet (pianissimo), moderately loud (mezzo forte) and moderately quiet (mezzo piano). 

Creating: Improvising 

 

Explore improvisation within a major and minor scale using the notes: C,D,E 

 

D,E,A 

 

F,G,A 

 

D,F,G 

 

Improvise simple vocal patterns using 'Question and Answer' phrases. 

 

Understand the difference between creating a rhythm pattern and a pitch pattern. 

 

Explore improvisation within a major scale 

 

using the notes: 

 

C,D,E 

 

C,G,A 

 

G,A,B 

 

F,G,A 

 

Work with a partner and in the class to improvise simple 'Question and Answer' phrases, to be sung and played on untuned percussion, creating a musical conversation. 

 

Explore improvisation within a major scale 

 

using the notes: 

 

C,D,E 

 

C,D,E,F,G 

 

C,D,E,G,A 

 

G,A,B 

 

G,A,B,D,E 

 

G,A,B,C,D 

 

F,G,A 

 

F,G,A,C,D 

 

Become more skilled in improvising (using voices, tuned and untuned percussion, and instruments played in whole-class/group/individual/instrumental teaching), inventing short ‘on-the-spot’ responses using a limited note-range. 

 

Compose over a simple groove. 

 

Compose over a drone. 

 

Structure musical ideas (eg using echo or 'Question and Answer' phrases) to create music that has a beginning, middle and end. 

Explore improvisation within a major scale 

 

using the notes: 

 

C,D,E 

 

C,D,E,G,A 

 

C,D,E,F,G 

 

D, E, F♯, A, B 

 

D,E,F,G,A 

 

Improvise on a limited range of pitches on the instrument you are now learning, making use of musical features, including smooth (legato) and detached (staccato) articulation. 

 

Improvise over a simple chord progression. 

 

Improvise over a groove. 

 

Explore improvisation within a major scale, using the notes: 

 

C, D, E♭, F, G 

 

C,D,E,F,G 

 

C,D,E,G,A 

 

F, G, A, B♭, C 

 

D,E,F,G,A 

 

Improvise over a simple groove, responding to the beat and creating a satisfying melodic shape. 

 

Experiment with using a wider range of dynamics, including very loud (fortissimo), very quiet (pianissimo), moderately loud (mezzo forte) and moderately quiet (mezzo piano). 

 

Explore improvisation within a major scale, 

 

using the notes: 

 

C,D,E,F,G 

 

G, A, B♭, C, D 

 

G,A,B,C,D 

 

F,G,A,C,D 

 

Improvise over a groove, responding to the beat, creating a satisfying melodic shape with varied dynamics and articulation. 

 

Creating: Composing 

Create their own songs, or improvise a song around one they know. 

 

Explore and create graphic scores: 

 

Create musical sound effects and short sequences of sounds in response to music and video stimulus. 

 

Create a story, choosing and playing classroom instruments and/or soundmakers. 

 

Recognise how graphic notation can 

 

represent created sounds. Explore and 

 

invent your 

 

own symbols. 

 

Use music technology, if available, to capture, change and combine sounds. 

 

Use simple notation if appropriate: 

 

Create a simple melody using crotchets and minims: 

 

C, D 

 

C,D,E 

 

C,D,E,F 

 

C,D,E,F,G 

 

Start and end on the note C 

 

F, G 

 

F,G,A 

 

F,G,A,C 

 

F,G,A,C,D 

 

Start and end on the note F 

 

D, F 

 

D,F,G 

 

D,F,G,A 

 

D,F,G,A,C 

 

Start and end on the note D 

 

Explore and create graphic scores: 

 

Create musical sound effects and short sequences of sounds in response to music and video stimulus. 

 

Use graphic symbols, dot notation and stick notation, as appropriate, to keep a record of composed pieces. 

 

Create a story, choosing and playing classroom instruments. 

 

Create and perform your own rhythm patterns with stick notation, including crotchets, quavers and minims. 

 

Use music technology, if available, to capture, change and combine sounds. 

 

Use notation if appropriate: 

 

Create a simple melody using crotchets and minims: 

 

C, D 

 

C,D,E 

 

C,D,E,F 

 

C,D,E,F,G 

 

Start and end on the note C (C major) 

 

G, A 

 

G,A,B 

 

G,A,B,D 

 

G,A,B,D,E 

 

Start and end on the note G (Pentatonic on G) 

 

F, G 

 

F,G,A 

 

F,G,A,C 

 

F,G,A,C,D 

 

Start and end on the note F (Pentatonic on F) 

 

Create music and/or sound effects in response to music and video stimulus. 

 

Use music technology, if available, to capture, change and combine sounds. 

 

Compose over a simple chord progression. 

 

Compose over a simple groove. 

 

Compose over a drone. 

 

Start to use simple structures within compositions, eg introduction, verse, chorus or AB form. 

 

Use simple dynamics. 

 

Compose song accompaniments on tuned and untuned percussion, using known rhythms and note values. 

 

Create a simple melody using crotchets, minims and perhaps paired quavers: 

 

C, D 

 

C,D,E 

 

C,D,E,G 

 

C,D,E,G,A 

 

Start and end on the note C (Pentatonic on C) 

 

C, D 

 

C,D,E 

 

C,D,E,F 

 

C,D,E,F,G 

 

Start and end on the note C (C major) 

 

F, G 

 

F,G,A 

 

F, G, A, B♭ 

 

F, G, A, B♭, C 

 

Start and end on the note F (F major) 

 

G, A 

 

G,A,B 

 

G,A,B,D 

 

G,A,B,D,E 

 

Start and end on the note G (Pentatonic on G) 

 

Combine known rhythmic notation with letter names, to create short, pentatonic phrases using a limited range of five pitches, suitable for the instruments being learnt. 

 

Compose over a simple chord progression. 

 

Compose over a groove. 

 

Create music in response to music and video stimulus. 

 

Use music technology, if available, to capture, change and combine sounds. 

 

Start to use simple structures within compositions, eg introduction, verse, chorus or AB form. 

 

Use simple dynamics. 

 

Compose song accompaniments on tuned and untuned percussion, using known rhythms and note values. 

 

Create a melody using crotchets, minims, quavers and their rests. Use a pentatonic scale: 

 

C, D 

 

C,D,E 

 

C,D,E,G 

 

C,D,E,G,A 

 

Start and end on the note C (Pentatonic on C) 

 

C, D 

 

C,D,E 

 

C,D,E,F 

 

C,D,E,F,G 

 

Start and end on the note C (C major) 

 

A, B 

 

A,B,C 

 

A,B,C,D 

 

A,B,C,D,E 

 

Start and end on the note A (A minor) 

 

D, E 

 

D,E,F 

 

D,E,F,G 

 

D,E,F,G,A 

 

Start and end on the note D (D minor) 

 

G, A 

 

G,A,B 

 

G,A,B,D 

 

G,A,B,D,E 

 

Start and end on the note G (Pentatonic on G) 

 

Create music in response to music and video stimulus. 

 

Use music technology, if available, to capture, change and combine sounds. 

 

Start to use structures within compositions, eg introduction, multiple verse and chorus sections, AB form or ABA form (ternary form). 

 

Use chords to compose music to evoke a specific atmosphere, mood or environment. 

 

Use simple dynamics. 

 

Use rhythmic variety. 

 

Compose song accompaniments, perhaps using basic chords. 

 

Use a wider range of dynamics, including fortissimo (very loud), pianissimo (very quiet), mezzo forte (moderately loud) and mezzo piano (moderately quiet). 

 

Use full scales in different keys. 

 

Understand how chord triads are formed and play them on tuned percussion, melodic instruments or keyboards. Perform simple, chordal accompaniments. 

 

Create a melody using crotchets, quavers and minims, and perhaps semibreves and semiquavers, plus all equivalent rests. Use a pentatonic and a full scale. Use major and minor tonality: 

 

F, G 

 

F,G,A 

 

F, G, A, B♭ 

 

F, G, A, B♭, C 

 

Start and end on the note F (F major) 

 

G, A 

 

G,A,B 

 

G,A,B,C 

 

G,A,B,C,D 

 

Start and end on the note G (G major) 

 

G, A 

 

G,A,B 

 

G,A,B,D 

 

G,A,B,D,E 

 

Start and end on the note G (Pentatonic on G) 

 

Plan and compose an 8 or 16-beat melodic phrase, using the pentatonic scale (eg C, D, E, G, A), and incorporate rhythmic variety and interest. Play this melody on available tuned percussion and/or orchestral instruments. Notate this melody. 

 

Either of these melodies can be enhanced with rhythmic or simple chordal accompaniment. 

 

Create a simple chord progression. 

 

Compose a ternary (ABA form) piece; use available music software/apps to create and record it, discussing how musical contrasts are achieved. 

 

Create music in response to music and video stimulus. 

 

Use music technology, if available, to capture, change and combine sounds. 

 

Start to use structures within compositions, eg introduction, multiple verse and chorus sections, AB form or ABA form (ternary form). 

 

Use simple dynamics. 

 

Use rhythmic variety. 

 

Compose song accompaniments, perhaps using basic chords. 

 

Use a wider range of dynamics, including fortissimo (very loud), pianissimo (very quiet), mezzo forte (moderately loud) and mezzo piano (moderately quiet). 

 

Use full scales in different keys. 

 

Create a melody using crotchets, quavers and minims, and perhaps semibreves and semiquavers, and all equivalent rests. Use a pentatonic and a full scale. Use major and minor tonality: 

 

C, D 

 

C,D,E 

 

C,D,E,F 

 

C,D,E,F,G 

 

Start and end on the note C (C major) 

 

G, A 

 

G,A,B 

 

G,A,B,D 

 

G,A,B,D,E 

 

Start and end on the note G (Pentatonic on G) 

Performing 

  • Perform songs, rhymes, poems and stories with others, and (when appropriate) try to move in time with music. 

Enjoy and have fun performing. 

 

Choose a song/songs to perform to a well-known audience. 

 

Prepare a song to perform. 

 

Communicate the meaning of the song. 

 

Add actions to the song. 

 

Play some simple instrumental parts. 

..................Column Break.................. 

Practise, rehearse and share a song that has been learned in the lesson, from memory or with notation, and with confidence. 

 

Decide on any actions, instrumental parts/improvisatory ideas/composed passages to be practised and included in the performance. 

 

Talk about what the song means and why it was chosen to share. 

 

Talk about the difference between rehearsing a song and performing it. 

 

Practise, rehearse and share a song that has been learned in the lesson, from memory or with notation, and with confidence. 

 

Play and perform melodies following staff notation, using a small range, as a whole class or in small groups. 

 

Include any actions, instrumental parts/improvisatory ideas/composed passages within the rehearsal and in the performance. 

 

Talk about what the song means and why it was chosen to share. 

 

Reflect on feelings about sharing and performing, eg excitement, nerves, enjoyment. 

 

Rehearse and enjoy the opportunity to share what has been learned in the lessons. 

 

Perform, with confidence, a song from memory or using notation. 

 

Play and perform melodies following staff notation, using a small range, as a whole class or in small groups. 

 

Include instrumental parts/improvisatory sections/composed passages within the rehearsal and performance. 

 

Explain why the song was chosen, including its composer and the historical and cultural context of the song. 

 

Communicate the meaning of the words and articulate them clearly. 

 

Use the structure of the song to communicate its mood and meaning in the performance. 

 

Talk about what the rehearsal and performance has taught the student. 

 

Understand how the individual fits within the larger group ensemble. 

 

Reflect on the performance and how well it suited the occasion. 

 

Discuss and respond to any feedback; consider how future performances might be different. 

Create, rehearse and present a holistic performance for a specific purpose, for a friendly but unknown audience. 

 

Perhaps perform in smaller groups, as well as the whole class. 

 

Perform a range of repertoire pieces and arrangements combining acoustic instruments, to form mixed ensembles, including a school orchestra. 

 

Perform from memory or with notation, with confidence and accuracy. 

 

Include instrumental parts/improvisatory sections/composed passages within the rehearsal and performance. 

 

Explain why the song was chosen, including its composer and the historical and cultural context of the song. 

 

A student leads part of the rehearsal and part of the performance. 

 

Record the performance and compare it to a previous performance; explain how well the performance communicated the mood of each piece. 

 

Discuss and talk musically about the strengths and weaknesses of a performance. 

 

Collect feedback from the audience and reflect how future performances might be different. 

Create, rehearse and present a holistic performance for a specific event, for an unknown audience. 

 

Perform a range of songs as a choir in school assemblies, school performance opportunities and to a wider audience. 

 

Create, rehearse and present a holistic performance, with a detailed understanding of the musical, cultural and historical contexts. 

 

Perform from memory or with notation. 

 

Understand the value of choreographing any aspect of a performance. 

 

A student or a group of students rehearse and lead parts of the performance. 

 

Understand the importance of the performing space and how to use it. 

 

Record the performance and compare it to a previous performance. 

 

Collect feedback from the audience and reflect how the audience believed in the performance. 

 

Discuss how the performance might change if it was repeated in a larger/smaller performance space. 

Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now

×